41 Comments

Thank you for the insightful reflections on a perceived dichotomy that affects so many of us.

Was it John Updike who famously maintained two -- or even three -- desks? One for writing/creating, a second for editing, and a third for conducting submissions, correspondence, and the general business side of the writing career. Whether that was Updike or someone else, it was genius.

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Wow. It's great to know that I'm not alone in feeling this way. I often don't want to write what it takes to get paid, which is why my blog is not filled with posts like, "How to write a great blog post in 5 steps." Instead, I write about things like abundance, how to discover your calling, and how to wield the energetic force of influence. I need to find a way to let THAT content pay the bills!

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This is a great deconstruction of a depressingly common paradigm. I'm a writer who recognizes that my passions are not easily marketable. The chasm between making what I love and making a living at it seems impossibly wide. But I've learned that abandoning my art altogether is spiritually ruinous, so I might as well keep writing, and just keep looking for creative ways to connect the financial dots.

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Thank you for this reflection! I started to write a paper yesterday about the importance of writing for ourselves in content creation, and not only for others. I am convinced we can create with even more enthusiasm when it’s first done for us.

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This is exactly why I refuse to niche.

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“Artists create things based on what they want to see in the world and/or for the joy they experience during the creation process.”

Yes! This is how writing and painting is for me!

Great blog!

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Yes. Exactly. We writers do it because we can’t not do it.

Michael Mohr

‘Sincere American Writing’

https://michaelmohr.substack.com/

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Lovely balanced article here - I relate to this line especially.

'Artists create things based on what they want to see in the world and/or for the joy they experience during the creation process.'

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This is a great article. Thank you. Like I said in my comment directly on it, aspects of your point remind me of the “multiple desk” method that some authors use for conducting different parts of their creative business — writing, editing, marketing and correspondence — at different desks or stations. Recognizing, honoring, embracing, and optimizing one’s effectiveness in each role is a winner’s move.

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This is exactly what happened to me after several years in the entrepreneurial coaching space: “you’re forced to continue discussing topics that no longer resonate. This thing you once loved has become hollow and draining.” I stopped marketing myself because I just couldn’t stand talking about any of it anymore! And instead I started my Substack, where I write about whatever is present for me— topics that aren’t exactly moneymakers, like infertility, mental health, and talking to bugs!

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Best read yet as i delve into Substack.

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Apr 11, 2023·edited Apr 11, 2023Liked by Scott Britton

I wanted to experiment on this comment I kept a comment 100% me alone on another comment and GPT on the comment on the piece.

I wrote on one piece how it has a different taste, it does. I have been using this testing for a new article. Thanks for spotting it out 🙂.

I did prompt him to summarize my longer response 🤖. It's funny how it reflects to the tower of Babel.

Here is the original:

I loved this piece and spotlight on an artist's transition. I guess we awaken as "artists" to speaking more and owning our spaces. And it demands to think creatively about spreading our art and vision. With the danger of creating following what draws attention, it becomes a signal to getting back home (creating genuinely). I think marketing reveals itself to artists and we enter a growing gear of positioning. I heard this great quote by Sarah Gray that states that: "In the space of inspiration the sale is easy". It is effortless to "do your thing", inspire, help people and as a result receive support from that. I guess artists who shy away from taking such space, grow into marketing and it's relevance creatively as long as it serves them "doing their thing". I feel it is a skill you unlock. From curiosity, to observing, to decoding and finally crafting your own formula.

Not easy for artists, not easy at all. We do like staying behind the scenes creating and being in our creative genius.

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Scott, Thank you for these insights. D

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I loved this piece about an artist's transition and the importance of creative thinking when it comes to spreading our art and vision. It's easy to get caught up in creating for attention, but it's important to stay true to our genuine creative selves. Sarah Gray said it best: "In the space of inspiration, the sale is easy." When we do what we love and inspire others, the support will follow. Marketing is a skill that can be learned, from observing to decoding and crafting our own formula. It's not easy for artists who prefer to stay behind the scenes, but it's crucial for positioning ourselves and our art.

It can only help artists create better art and excel in "doing their thing".

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The reason I left social media apps is because I found that instead of innocent marketing, I found it was drawing me deeper into the online world and out of real life. The platforms are designed to get you to spend as much time on them as possible and my addictive brain couldn’t moderate itself. Maybe other people are better, so I haven’t denounced all social media as evil (yet) but for me and my partner it kind of was. On any given day, an opportunity to get chores done that were desperately needed could easily get swept into a scroll session and time lost so fast. We just had to make the call and find other ways to connect with people, in real life. If I could limit myself to 15 minutes a day on social media I’d have kept it, but it always ended up being more like an hour plus, and I don’t have that kind of free time or hours in a day.

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Not at all. I am glad you asked. I think it's useful and it can be used in many ways. As a tester, I also witness it's limit for me 🙂 That is cool as well to know what can be done with these tools.

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